Special rules for parental benefit paid to the father

You may be entitled to parental benefit if you have had a pensionable income for no less than six of the last ten months prior to the parental benefit period.

The date of birth or adoption determines which set of regulations that apply to your situation, and how long your parental quota is. Below, you can read more about your rights if the date of birth or adoption is 1 July 2014 or later. Different rules apply if your child was born or adopted on 30 June 2014 or before.

The father is entitled to be two weeks off work in connection to the birth. This right is not a part of the parental benefit period, but is described in arbeidsmiljølovens § 12-3 (text in Norwegian). You can read about wages in connection to leaves on Altinn.no (text in Norwegian). If you have questions, you may contact Arbeidstilsynet.

How long can you claim parental benefit?

The parental benefit period is split in three between you and the mother.One part is reserved for the mother (Maternal quota), one part is reserved for you (Paternal quota), and the shared period can be freely distributed between you as you choose. Below is more information about your rights. Read more about parental benefit.

If the father is claiming the shared period

As a father, you are entitled to parental benefit if you have had a pensionable income for no less than 6 of the last 10 months prior to the benefit period. If the father is claiming parental benefits during the shared period, there are certain requirements that apply to the mother's occupational activity. She must:

  • be working full time or part time
  • be a full-time student in an approved education programme
  • be a part-time student in an approved education programme while also working, making her combined activity equivalent to full-time employment
  • be entirely dependent on assistance to be able to care for the child due to illness or injury or be admitted to a health care institution. In these cases, her doctor must document
    1. how the illness or injury is affecting your ability to care for the child
    2. the degree to which you are dependent on assistance
    3. how long the illness or injury is expected to last
  • be participating in an introduction programme for recently arrived immigrants
  • be participating in the qualification programme.

If the mother is working 75 percent or more of full-time employment, this is considered equivalent to working full time. For example, if the mother is working 80 percent of full time, the father may draw parental benefits up to 100 percent coverage. If the mother is working less than 75 percent of full-time employment, the father's reduction in parental benefit will be equivalent to the reduction in the mother's working hours. For example, if the mother is working 50 percent of full time, the father will be entitled to draw parental benefits up to 50 percent coverage.

If the mother has sole parental responsibility for the child, the parents may jointly agree that the father claims for part of the parental benefit period, including the paternal quota.

If the father is the only one entitled to parental benefit

As the father, you are entitled to parental benefit if you have had a pensionable income for no less than 6 of the last 10 months prior to the benefit period, but you are not entitled to a paternal quota unless the mother has also accumulated individual parental benefit rights and is claiming this right.

The same requirements apply to the mother's occupational activity, as when the father is claiming the shared period.

If the mother meets the activity requirement, you may be entitled to parental benefits for up to 40 or 50 weeks, depending on whether you have chosen 100 percent or 80 percent coverage. You may not begin to draw parental benefit before 6 weeks after birth. If you adopt, you may start to draw parental benefit at the time you assume care of the child. If the mother does not satisfy the requirements for activity 6 weeks after birth or adoption, you will lose parental benefits. To be able to claim all the weeks you are entitled to, you must start the period of parental benefit 6 weeks after birth, and no later than 6 weeks after you assume care of the child by adoption.

If you want to postpone the parental benefit period for two 2 weeks or more due to full-time work, you must first draw parental benefits continuously for at least 6 weeks. In these 6 weeks you can combine work and parental benefit. You can not postpone the parental benefit period if the mother is not participating in occupational activity.

If you live together with the mother and she is receiving disability benefit, you may be entitled to parental benefit for a period of 10 weeks. These weeks must be drawed after 6 weeks after the date of birth or the date on which you assumed care of the child in the case of adoption, and the must be completed within 46 or 56 weeks after birth or assumption of care.

Remember to apply at the right time.

You may be entitled to a lump-sum grant

If you do not qualify for parental benefit, you may be entitled to a lump-sum grant

  • for each child you adopt alone.
  • when you assume parental responsibility following the death of the other parent.
  • when you assume parental responsibility pursuant to Sections 38 and 63 of the Children Act.
  • when you, within 56 weeks after birth or assumption of care, have assumed actual custody of the child with the objective of obtaining sole parental responsibility pursuant to the provisions of the Children Act.

Co-mothers have the same rights as fathers.

Multiple births and adoptions when only the father is entitled to parental benefit

When you are the only parent entitled to parental benefit, you are not entitled to a paternal quota. However, you may choose to claim parental benefit for the additional weeks you are granted following a multiple birth/assumption of care by adoption. No requirements apply to the mother's occupational activity during these weeks, and you may choose to start drawing benefits immediately after birth/adoption. You must begin drawing benefits for these additional weeks during the regular benefit period, i.e. within 46 or 56 weeks after birth/assumption of care by adoption, depending on the type of coverage you have chosen.

Benefit period when the father has sole parental responsibility for the child

If you have sole parental responsibility for the child, you may be entitled to parental benefit for up to 46 weeks at 100 percent coverage, or 56 weeks at 80 percent coverage. This applies to both birth and adoption. The degree of coverage applies to the entire benefit period. If the mother has been receiving parental benefit before you were granted sole parental responsibility, you will receive parental benefit for the remaining period.